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Dogs In Hot Cars - When Will People Learn?

Dogs in Hot Cars

Thousands of poor dogs die in hot cars every year. People just don’t realise how hot their cars get. For example, if it’s 22 degrees outside, inside your car can get up to 47 degrees in an hour. Imagine sitting in a car at that temperature for half an hour.

In 2012, Dr. Ernie Ward, a vet put himself in a hot car as an experiment, to try and show people just how hot and unbearable it gets. Check out his video on YouTube here He explains that even with all four windows slightly open, there is no breeze at all and the heat becomes unbearable within minutes. It’s a horrible way to die, being stuck in a boiling hot car with no way out and no one to help you. An NFL player does the same thing in to try and help raise awareness.

Dogs can be very sensitive to heat, and will overheat quicker than owners might realise. Some breeds, such as bulldogs and pugs are particularly sensitive to the heat, but all dogs are at risk. Don’t be fooled into thinking that if you park in the shade, leave the windows open and leave your dog some water that they will be ok on a hot day. Some people also take the risk of leaving their dog in a car when it is cloudy outside, but then the weather changes quickly and suddenly the dog is in danger. Be aware the weather can sometimes change from cloudy to sunny in a few minutes.

It’s just not worth the risk, and these deaths can be so easily avoided.

We claim to love our dogs to pieces, yet some owners do some very reckless things. There are countless stories of dogs dying in hot cars on the news, yet people still don’t learn. What will it take for owners to realise?

Here are some helpful tips to avoid putting your dog at risk:

  • Always plan your journeys. Check the weather before you set off anywhere and if it’s too hot, leave your dog at home.
  • When you are travelling in your car make sure your dog isn’t in direct sunlight. It can still be too hot for your dog in the car when you are in it, keep an eye on them and look out for signs of discomfort.
  • If you do have to travel try and leave time for plenty of stops.
  • Sometimes people leave their dog in the car when there is no need, search for dog friendly places on your route and you can take your dog with you


for more information about what to do if your dog overheats and if you see a dog suffering in a hot car.

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