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Chug


Crosses between chihuahuas and pugs, endearing chugs are characterful small dogs. Due to their mixed parentage, each chug is that little bit different in both appearance and temperament. You never know exactly what you are going to get with a chug and that is part of their charm.

Which breed group is the Chug in?

Breed group: none – Not recognised by the Kennel Club

Chug breed history

There are no records to illustrate when breeders first began developing the chug. These dogs started to appear in the early 2000s and they are rising in popularity. It is thought that the dogs were initially developed in the United States but they are now bred in the UK. The chug has many fans but is not recognised by the kennel Club.

Chug breed characteristics

Chugs may inherit any combination of traits from their parents and so vary greatly in appearance. Some dogs look more like pugs, others more like chihuahuas. They tend to have smooth coats which are straight. However, descendants of longhaired chihuahuas can boast longer coats. Chugs have domed heads, large round eyes and furrowed brows. Due to their diverse parentage, they can have broad or short muzzles but are usually sturdily built with broad chests and level backs. Chugs can exhibit a wide variety of coat colours and textures.

It is hard to predict the temperaments of chugs as they may be aloof like chihuahuas or posses the amusing traits of pugs. They are usually affectionate dogs but their chihuahua genes can mean they are aggressive to other dogs if not properly socialised. Chugs tend to be barkers and they often suffer from separation anxiety.

  • Lifespan: 10-13 years
  • Height: up to 31cm
  • Weight: up to 9kg
  • Tend to have short, smooth coats
  • Wide range of colours
  • Domed heads
  • Furrowed brows
  • Level backs
  • Muzzles vary
  • May be aloof
  • Can be aggressive to other dogs
  • Tend to bark a lot
  • Suffer from separation anxiety

Health issues with the Chug

Chugs are sturdy little dogs but are prone to numerous health conditions associated with chihuahuas and pugs:

  • Eye Disorders including cataracts, distichiasis, PRA, Corneal ulcers and entropian
  • Muzzle Problems
  • Elongated Soft Palate
  • Stenotic Nares
  • Intestinal Issues
  • Intussusception
  • Leg Problems
  • Luxating Patella
  • Spine Issues
  • Hemivertebrae
  • Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE)
  • Epilepsy
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Ear problems

What is the Chug bred for?

Chugs are bred only as appealing small pets.

What sort of owners does the Chug suit?

Chugs are generally wonderful companions and are low maintenance and so can be wonderful pets. They can live anywhere and don’t need a great deal of exercise. However, these dogs do tend to have health issues and may be aggressive to other dogs. Prospective owners with near neighbours should consider that chugs may bark a lot. These memorable little chaps are suitable for first time owners and would be good choices for older owners who can’t manage long walks


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