Cat Bowls – How to Choose


Cats / Saturday, May 21st, 2016
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How to Choose Perfect Cat Bowls

On the face of it you could use any plate or dish to feed your cat. In reality choice of cat bowls might prove crucial to your cat’s health and happiness. The wrong cat bowl can see your cat refusing to eat and it is equally important that you find the right place to put it. Cats can be very particular when it comes to their table manners!
'A Sumptuous CAT MEAL for the 'Doll-Faced cat pack' cat bowls

Shape and Style

Cats are best suited to eating from bowls rather than plates. Large plates can mean that some of the food provided is out of easy reach. Plates will also encourage other cats to pinch the food. The sides of the bowl should not be too high though as this can discourage cats from feeding. They feel uncomfortable when their whiskers have to bend in order to access the food.

Materials

Your cat bowl should be fashioned from a material which is easy to clean and which is resistant to damage. Scratches and gouges can harbour bacteria or hurt your cat’s mouth as they feed. Soft plastic bowls tend to scuff and can absorb odours which will put your cat off their food. The best materials for cat bowls are stainless steel, ceramics and rigid plastics.

Style

No cat will care what their food bowl looks like. They are only interested in the contents. However, if you prefer everything in your home to be stylish and coordinated then there is no reason why you can’t choose a great looking bowl which complements the décor in your home.

How Many Cat Bowls?

Your feline friend needs a water bowl as well as a food bowl. The two bowls are best kept completely separate as the water is easily contaminated with dropped food and odours. For this reason you might want to avoid double bowls. If you have more than one cat then you should provide each cat with its own food bowl as they may refuse to eat or be too intimidated to approach the food in a shared bowl.

Location

Food and water bowls are best placed in quiet areas of the house where the cats do not feel threatened. The bowls should be kept well away from litter trays as cats are naturally hygienic and will shun food that is placed close to their toilet.

It can help if you place the bowls on a mat which is easy to wipe clean. Cats do not benefit from hands and do not use cutlery so some spillage is inevitable. This should be cleaned away frequently before it starts to rot. The mat will also serve to anchor the bowls and to make them more visible to people who might accidently step in them.

Cats are fastidious creatures and this tendency can be confused with fussiness. If you provide a nice clean bowl which isn’t too deep and locate it in a cat friendly position then your cats will be happy to eat. Cats which refuse to eat may not be rejecting your choice of cat food, they could be saying no to their bowls.